Showing respect for
our environment.
Sorghum
the reliable crop.

Sorghum: a real response in the face of climate global warming

Sorghum remarkably recovers groundwater using the unique powers of its root system and evapotranspiration regulation. Its own needs are moderate (around 400 to 500 mm), and it holds up well in situations of hydric stress. In soils of moderate depth, sorghum requires far less water than do other springtime crops.

Anti-parasite action

Upon introduction, sorghum can help alleviate the pressures created by some parasites. In particular, sorghum is known for its effect on nematodes. Furthermore, it can be grown in zones where pressure from Diabrotica (Western Europe) and Macrophomina (Southern Europe) can be too high.

Frugal with fertilisers

100 to 150 kg of nitrogen and 60 kg of P, K are enough to achieve agood yield. What’s more, it is in large part returned to the soil after harvest: 40% nitrogen, 80-85% potassium and 20-30% phosphorus. The amount to be injected is determined by the yield sought.

A response to environmental and agronomic constraints due to crop rotation.

With its extensively-developed root system, its capacity to grow at the height of summer and its high biomass output, sorghum offers numerous benefits in rotation: it protects the soil in summer and makes it easier to manage weeds during the following rotation, by using its high coverage power to compete for resources. When used as a pre-product to spring crops, it offers the benefi t of mitigating soil erosion and nitrogen leaching, as well as preserving soil structure.

CO2 Absorption

One of sorghum’s specific qualities lies in its being a socalled C4 plant, like corn and sugar cane. Thanks to this mechanism, the plant offers better photosynthetic yield, even in warm conditions or high temperatures.

Others benefits

Water

Opportunities in food

See the program

Sorghum and You. Tell us everything !